Mapperley Village

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Memories by Pat Hodgkinson (nee Wood)

Thank you to Pats daughter Elaine for her input

Pat was the daughter of Joe and Mary Wood of 1 Coachways. She had a younger brother, Alan.

The family moved from Sandiacre in 1939 as Joe got a job at Mapperley Pit. Pat recalls the first person they saw on arrival in the village was Mrs Beale. She remembers that the same day they went for a walk down to Mapperley Pond and then for a picnic on Shipley Hill.

They moved into 33 Mapperley village, later moving to 1 The Coachways when the council houses were built.

Pat recalls several village ladies who worked for the Miller Mundy family at Shipley Hall. Mrs Connie Wood was a maid there and Mrs Bedford was a nanny, George Bedford looked after the horses.

During WWII Mapperley received some evacuees.

Some of the villages that Pat remembers as a child was Enoch Thornley, Father of Malcolm and Olive. Mrs Boam who ran the Post Office. Wesley Derbyshire who had the corner shop and his wife Julie and Billy Hawley and Miss Hunt who taught the juniors in Mapperley School and lived at Marlpool.

Bertie Porter was a Gamekeeper and Mr Pace lived at the Pond House. The policeman was Bobby Twyt.

Wedding

Pat married Francis (Frank) Edward Hodgkinson in Holy Trinity, Mapperley in 1960. Photo taken outside the old church.

Mr Joe Wood, Pats father, who has played many roles, including that of miner, rural district councillor, trades union official and believe it or not that of a poet.

Mr Wood has composed poetry that has been published in the Church of England Newspaper and other magazines.

His style of poetry is simple and unsophisticated. The following lines are taken from 'The Spirit of Britain'

The promise of the blood and tears
Of irksome toil and sweat
The tragedy of wasted years.
We bitterly regret.

We always knew the darkest hour
Was just before the dawn
Shall Britain lose her pride, and pow'r
No she shall be reborn.

From each according to his strengths,
To each unto his need.
Then shall this nation be at length
A happy land indeed

In 1949 Mr Wood won the Miner's Poem Competition organised by the Recruitment Branch of the Ministry of Fuel and Power, North Midland Region. There were more than 70 entries, and Mr Wood took for his theme the nationalisation of the industry.


Go-To Alan

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